Friday, December 21, 2012

Happy Holidays - Morrisseau's Animal Unity

As 2012 comes to a close, we would like to take this time to thank our wonderful customers for making this year a success. From our family to yours, we wish you a delightful holiday season and a happy New Year. (Please note KRG will be closed from Dec. 23 until Jan. 7, 2013; reopening on Tues., Jan.  8, 2013).

We leave you with an important painting that portrays one of Norval Morrisseau's universal themes which he revisited in different variations over the course of his artistic career — In Spirit We Are One.

Illustrated: Animal Unity (1978) Acrylic on canvas, 50x108 in, 127x274.32 cm. Provenance: By descent - Collection of Mr. & Mrs. John Payne; The Pollock Gallery, Toronto; Acquired directly from the artist. Reproduced: p. 158, Sinclair/Pollock, The Art of Norval Morrisseau. Toronto: Methuen Publications, 1979. Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
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Sunday, November 11, 2012

Norval Morrisseau Early Birch Bark, 1968

Norval Morrisseau
Untitled (Fish), 1968
Ink on birch bark
3.75x7.25in, 9.525x18.415cm
Provenance: Private collection, New Hampshire, U.S.; Acquired from the artist at Beardmore in 1968. Reproduced: p. 34,  Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Toronto, 2012. Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.

"To the Indian a fish represents the human soul, one turns into a fish as the asteral (sic) body journeys into the land of his supernatural totemic existence; if it appears that he has pleased his ancestoral (sic) abode his place there will be forever..." - Norval Morrisseau
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Saturday, October 20, 2012

Norval Morrisseau - Extended until Nov. 20

There's been an overwhelming response to our current Norval Morrisseau retrospective, so much so that we have decided to extend the exhibition another month. On view until Nov. 20: An unprecedented number of original works from the '70s illustrated in the Sinclair/Pollock book, The Art of Norval Morrisseau (Methuen, 1979). A rare, incised birch bark scroll is of particular importance. Circa 1958-61, Thunderbird With Ancestral Motifs was part of the Imperial Oil Collection. The scroll was originally acquired from Jack Pollock in 1980. Norval Morrisseau is pictured above, at age 35, painting outdoors — which he enjoyed thoroughly — at Red Lake during August, 1966.
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Saturday, October 13, 2012

Morrisseau Art Stands Test of Time, 1975

"A vibrant interplay of birds, fishes and snakes."

On August 25, 1975, Time Magazine published an arts review on the iconic Canadian painter, Norval Morrisseau. Time reported, "The result is an art of fierce clarity and sophistication ... Morrisseau has moved to more flowing and self-confident works." Three original paintings illustrated the article: The Artist With His Four Wives (1975), Self-Portrait Devoured by His Own Passions (1974) and Nature's Balance (1975, pictured above). Remarking on the original painting titled Nature's Balance, arts reporter, Jon Anderson, wrote, "A vibrant interplay of birds, fishes and snakes." He continued, "The content of Morrisseau's current works is often more personally revealing than he cares to discuss." Powerful words from the past still ring true today.

Illustrated: Nature's Balance, 1975, Acrylic on kraft paper, 73x48 in, 185.4x121.9 cm, Provenance: Collection of Faith Sinclair, Toronto; Acquired directly from the artist.  Reproduced: p. 114, Sinclair/Pollock, The Art of Norval Morrisseau. Toronto: Methuen Publications, 1979; p. 55, Carpenter, Carole, artmagazine (Nov/Dec 1979); Time magazine (Aug 25, 1975). Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Oct 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
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Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Norval Morrisseau: The Early Years, 1960

»Pictured is the streetside view (2008) of the house on McKenzie Island where Norval Morrisseau lived for some time, and where he first met Selwyn Dewdney (the self-taught archaeologist, ethnologist and author) and Bob Sheppard (the OPP constable stationed on McKenzie Island from 1956-60 who introduced the two) during the Spring of 1960. The house has been occupied by a couple for the past 19 years. Essentially, it hasn't undergone any major renovation since Morrisseau lived there.
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Saturday, October 6, 2012

Norval Morrisseau: The Early Years, 1967

»In 1967, Canadians joined together to celebrate Canada's 100th birthday. The Centennial Committee commissioned Norval Morrisseau to paint a monumental mural for the Indians of Canada pavilion during Expo 67 held in Montréal. Pavilion commissioner, Andrew Tanahokate Delisle, Chief of Caughnawaga (Kahnawake) First Nations, was responsible to provide visitors "with an honest, sincere depiction of Aboriginal life in Canada". Prior to completion, Norval Morrisseau walked off the job (which he left in Carl Ray's hands) over objections raised by government organizers to Morrisseau's portrayal of the bare-breasted Earth Mother. Remaining true to his vision, Morrisseau's dedication read, "In honor to my Grandfather Potan Onanakonagas and to our Ancestors - Copper Thunderbird".
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Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Norval Morrisseau: The Early Years, 1965

»Iconic Canadian painter, Norval Morrisseau, proudly displays one of his transformational paintings inside his home at Red Lake in 1965. This painting shows a shaman figure in full regalia, with medicine bags worn around the neck—a symbol connected to personal protection and power—in partial transformation as the mythical thunderbird.
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Saturday, September 29, 2012

Morrisseau's Shaman Transforming With Bears

Norval Morrisseau
Shaman Transforming With Bears, 1986 [SOLD]
Acrylic on canvas
47.5x29.5 in, 120.65x74.93 cm
Provenance: Private Collection, Maple Ridge, BC; Acquired from the artist
Reproduced: p. 16,  Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Norval Morrisseau 2010 Retrospective. Toronto, 2010.
Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Oct 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.

»This original Morrisseau depicts of the story of how the spirits of their ancestors inhabit the bear. The split background is a reference to Morrisseau's belief in the religious movement known as Eckankar—three distinct colours denote separate planes of existence. Light blue offered protection to the soul. Bear always held a special significance for the artist. Not only was Morrisseau a member of the Bear Clan, but sacred bear communicated with Morrisseau during his Vision Quest. Morrisseau never lost sight of the underlying strength of this important subject matter over his artistic career.
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Friday, September 21, 2012

2012 Retrospective @ Kinsman Robinson Galleries


Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective @ Kinsman Robinson Galleries
September 15 - October 20, 2012
Honouring 50 years of Morrisseau history
40-page colour catalogue available

Norval Morrisseau's major dealer and principal gallery is showcasing a 50-year retrospective of Morrisseau's artwork from Sep 15 until Oct 20, 2012. "Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective" features photographs of the revered artist and 46 original works of art in order to celebrate the fifty-year anniversary since Morrisseau burst onto the Canadian art scene.

Norval Morrisseau came to prominence following his first sold-out exhibition at Toronto's Pollock Gallery in 1962. Time Magazine (Sep 28, 1962) reported, “Few exhibits in Canadian history have touched off a greater immediate stir than Morrisseau's.” It's a statement that was true half a century ago and still holds true today. Five decades later, Morrisseau's artwork is notable for its kaleidoscopic colour, bold black outlines and sacred imagery. Morrisseau's signature style has cemented the artist as an icon of Canadian art.

Founded in 1980, Kinsman Robinson Galleries (KRG) specializes in Norval Morrisseau art of exceptional calibre and significance. The gallery co-authored two hardcover books along with Norval Morrisseau. KRG has held three catalogued exhibitions since Norval Morrisseau passed away. 2012 Retrospective is one of the biggest Morrisseau exhibitions of recent years featuring both paintings and drawings by the iconic Canadian painter Norval Morrisseau.
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Friday, September 14, 2012

Honouring 50 years of Morrisseau history

Celebrate 50 years of Morrisseau history with the gallery that represented Norval Morrisseau and supported the artist during his lifetime. On view are several never-before-exhibited artworks from prominent Morrisseau collectors, including Lister Sinclair (who co-wrote the book, The Art of Norval Morrisseau), Edna Fulford (who ran the Beardmore lumber yard and hardware store), Walter Ard (who taught at the Red Lake School) and Robert Houle (who attended the Beardmore tea party). September 14, 2012 marks the 50-year anniversary of Jack Pollock's first sold-out exhibit which catapulted Morrisseau to international acclaim. Within the first three days, 28 paintings by Norval Morrisseau had been sold. Around the same time, self-taught archaeologist, ethnologist and author, Selwyn Dewdney wrote, "Norval's paintings have a passion, spontaneity and unpretentious simplicity that expose the emptiness of much contemporary painting." KRG's catalogued exhibition runs from Sep 15 to Oct 20, 2012.

Illustrated: Norval And Third Eye, 1976, Acrylic on canvas, 30x24 in, 76.2x60.96 cm. Provenance: Collection of Robert Houle, Toronto; Wells Gallery, Ottawa; The Pollock Gallery, Toronto; Acquired directly from the artist. Reproduced: p. 7, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Toronto, 2012. Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
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Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Morrisseau - Bold And Beautiful

Norval Morrisseau
Week-Kuno, Shaman In The Astral Plane, 1993
Acrylic on canvas
59x48in, 149.86x121.92cm
Provenance: Private collection, Ottawa; Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto; Collection of Gabe Vadas; Acquired from the artist
Reproduced: p. 4, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Toronto, 2012.
Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
Week-Kuno
the Child of God Send
into the Worald [sic]
to heaven experience.
in his Nightly Vishion [sic]
he knows he is not bound to
flesh - and it able's [sic] at free
will to come and go
in the Blue Worald [sic]
of Animals and pets
»Handwritten by Norval Morrisseau (verso, in graphite) in 1993.
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Saturday, September 8, 2012

Norval Morrisseau Online Catalogue

Here's a digital copy (PDF) of KRG's upcoming exhibition, Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective — the fourth such exhibition of the late Norval Morrisseau in the past five years. Opening in a week's time on September 15, it marks 50 years since Jack Pollock's first sold-out Morrisseau show in Toronto during September, 1962. Toronto-based contemporary Anishnabe Saulteaux artist, Robert Houle, has contributed his newly written first-hand account chronicling Norval Morrisseau's legendary tea party from 1978, illustrated with never-before-seen photos, which makes exceedingly interesting reading.
Morrisseau 2012 Catalogue
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Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Morrisseau's painting Raven And The Sun

Norval Morrisseau
Raven And The Sun, c. 1966 [SOLD]
Acrylic on artist board
24x45.25 in, 60.96x114.935 cm
Provenance: By descent - Collection of Lorna McConnell, Ontario;
Acquired from the artist
Reproduced: pp. 16-17,  Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Toronto, 2012.
Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
One day in anchient [sic] times
there was no sun in the sky.
As the huge raven was flying
low by the ocean he seen [sic]
a very shinning pepple [sic] or stone.
Being very mischief and
curious took the stone into
its mouth and swallowed
it the the [sic] Raven flyed [sic]
into the sky feeling very funny
becane [sic] to vomit out comes
the stone bursting into flames
And light upon the earth
for the stone (being really
the sun) took orbit.
Today much respect is held
to Ravens by the Ojibwa
Indian for his curiousty [sic]
bought [sic] light upon the earth.
»Handwritten by Norval Morrisseau (in graphite, on 3-hole punched narrow-ruled paper) around the time of Jack Pollock's art class at the Beardmore Elementary School in Aug 1962.
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Thursday, August 23, 2012

Norval Morrisseau's iconic Canadian art

Norval Morrisseau
Untitled (Sacred Bear), c. 1969
Acrylic on kraft board
30x32 in, 76.2x81.28 cm
Signed/framed
»Affectionately referred to as "dancing bear" by gallery staff, Norval Morrisseau executed this particular painting with a high degree of craftsmanship and skill during the late 1960s. The subject matter, skill level and style as well as the earth tones (that were part of Morrisseau's ever-popular colour palette) are telltale signs that you're looking at the real deal.
Provenance: Private collection, Montreal; The Shayne Gallery, Montreal; Artist’s agent working for Indian and Northern Affairs, Kenora; Acquired from the artist
Reproduced: p. 35,  Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Toronto, 2012.
Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
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Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Famed Morrisseau graces Canadian Art mag

Norval Morrisseau's original painting titled, Nature's Balance, 1975 (acrylic on kraft paper, 73x48 in, 185.4x121.9 cm) is featured in a full-page ad in the Fall issue of Canadian Art magazine (hits newsstands Sep 15).  It announces KRG's upcoming Morrisseau exhibit, 2012 Retrospective, honouring 50 years of Morrisseau history, where the painting will be on public display.  It's been half a century since Norval Morrisseau burst onto the Canadian art scene with his first sold-out show at Toronto's Pollock Gallery in September 1962.  The art world changed forever the day Morrisseau first laid brush to canvas and began to paint the legends of his people.  He gave the next generation of indigenous artists a new mode of expression to call their own, based on the now famous pictographic style once referred to as "The new age of Indian art".
Provenance: Collection of Faith Sinclair, TorontoAcquired directly from the artist.  Reproduced: p. 114, Sinclair/Pollock, The Art of Norval Morrisseau. Toronto: Methuen Publications, 1979; p. 55, Carpenter, Carole, artmagazine (Nov/Dec 1979); Time magazine, 1975.
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Sunday, August 5, 2012

50-year retrospective honours Morrisseau

Norval Morrisseau's major dealer and principal gallery will showcase a 50-year retrospective of Morrisseau's artwork from Sep 15 until Oct 20, 2012. "Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective" will feature photographs of the revered artist as well as 50 works of art in order to celebrate the fifty-year anniversary since Morrisseau burst onto the Canadian art scene.

Norval Morrisseau came to prominence following his first sold-out exhibition at Toronto's Pollock Gallery in 1962. Time Magazine (Sep 28, 1962) reported, “Few exhibits in Canadian history have touched off a greater immediate stir than Morrisseau's.” It's a statement that was true half a century ago and still holds true today. Time wrote, "The Toronto critics approved unanimously and speculated that self-taught Morrisseau may have launched a vogue as chic as that of the Cape Dorset Eskimo's prints."

Founded in 1980, Kinsman Robinson Galleries (KRG) specializes in Norval Morrisseau art of exceptional calibre and significance. The gallery co-authored two hardcover books along with Norval Morrisseau. KRG has held three catalogued exhibitions since Norval Morrisseau passed away. 2012 Retrospective is set to be one of the biggest Morrisseau exhibitions of recent years featuring both paintings and drawings by the iconic Canadian painter Norval Morrisseau. (Originally posted on Tues. Feb 7, 2012).

Illustrated: Nature's Balance, 1975, Acrylic on kraft paper, 73x48 in, 185.4x121.9 cm, Provenance: Collection of Faith Sinclair, Toronto; Acquired directly from the artist.  Reproduced: p. 114, Sinclair/Pollock, The Art of Norval Morrisseau. Toronto: Methuen Publications, 1979; p. 55, Carpenter, Carole, artmagazine (Nov/Dec 1979); Time magazine (Aug 25, 1975). Exhibited: Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective. Sep 15 - Nov 20, 2012, Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto.
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Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Missing Morrisseau painting presumed stolen

Norval Morrisseau
Untitled (Moose), 1968
Acrylic on paper
21x29 in, 53.3x73.7 cm
Signed/framed
»On July 18, 2012 at approximately 2:00 p.m., the above described painting by renowned Anishinabe artist Norval Morrisseau was reportedly taken off the back of a delivery van parked on Cumberland Street in Toronto's Bloor-Yorkville district. Norval Morrisseau is an iconic Canadian artist whose symbols and enduring artwork have become synonymous with Canada's national identity. A number of Morrisseau artworks in public collections are certified as being of "outstanding significance" to Canada's national heritage. If you have any information concerning the whereabouts of this painting, please call Toronto Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS or Toronto Police Service at 416-808-2222. (Police report #4427639 taken by PC Janet Stather - 53 Division).
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Saturday, July 14, 2012

Norval Morrisseau Art Exhibit July 18, 2012

In conjunction with the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) 33rd Annual General Assembly, the Host Committee along with Westerkirk Works of Art and the Royal Bank of Canada will co-host a one-day public exhibition of original Norval Morrisseau paintings. The AFN Delegate Reception for the Ontario Grand Chiefs includes a reception and viewing of this private collection of Norval Morrisseau paintings. Westerkirk Works of Art have produced a special edition publication specifically for the AFN 2012 Assembly. Contents include: An introduction by Ontario Regional Chief, Angus Toulouse; Essays by Elliott Doxtater-Wynn, Barry Ace and Robert Houle; A message from Sherry Brydson, Principal, Westerkirk Works of Art. Sherry Brydson writes, "Placing Morrisseau’s vision before us all can only result in fostering greater learning and positive understanding among all cultures."
»The one-day exhibit will be open and free to the general public on Wednesday, July 18, 2012 from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Location: Steam Whistle Brewing Art Gallery, The Roundhouse – 255 Bremner Blvd., Toronto, Canada, M5V 3M9, directly across from the south building of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, artshow@steamwhistle.ca
Illustrated: Unity of Children and Nature, c.1985, Acrylic on canvas, 40x96 in, 101.6x243.84 cm, Collection of Westerkirk Works of Art, Toronto
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Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Morrisseau's Transformation Of Human Into Bear

Transformation Of Human Into Bear, 1990 [SOLD]
Acrylic on canvas
48x36inches, 121.92x91.44cm
Titled (verso) by Norval Morrisseau with the artist's hand
»Telltale signs that you're looking at the real deal: Sureness and fluidity of line, varied and bright palette, vibrating primary colours accompanied by complex primary, secondary and tertiary colour relationships, detailed inner shape designs and flowing signature, just to name a few.
Provenance:
Private collection, Vancouver
Kinsman Robinson Galleries, Toronto
Acquired directly from the artist
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Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Distinguishing Norval Morrisseau Paintings

Professor James Z. Wang (College of Information Sciences and Technology, Penn State University) published an informative research paper on digital painting analysis on 15 August, 2009. The following is taken from the Abstract: "The technique has been applied to the paintings of renowned aboriginal Canadian artist Norval Morrisseau. Through computerized analysis of his authentic works and the imitations, it is revealed that the curves in his authentic paintings exhibit his commanding painting skills." Wang's conclusion noted, "It is found that Morrisseau’s paintings consistently demonstrate higher level of steadiness and coherence in curves." 

Wang was featured on NOVA ScienceNow (Art Authentication, season 3 & 4). He contributed to developing new computerized methods to help detect fake Van Goghs by analyzing the characteristics of brushstrokes. He was successful in determining the fake version of the painting from the original.Prof. Wang Study Twitter | kinsmanrobinson.com

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Inspired by Norval Morrisseau, TransMigration has world premiere May 10 – 13, 2012

Kaha:wi ("she carries" in the Mohawk language) Dance Theatre will bring together an incredible cast of performers for the upcoming world premiere of TransMigration, a co-production with Harbourfront Centre’s Planet IndigenUS as part of the NextSteps11/12 Series. This new production runs May 10, 11, 12, and 13, 2012 at Harbourfront Centre’s Fleck Dance Theatre (207 Queens Quay West, Toronto). All performances begin at 8:00 p.m. with the exception of Sunday, May 13 matinee at 3 p.m.

Four years in the making, TransMigration is a visually raw and engaging story inspired by the life and paintings of iconic Ojibwe shaman-artist Norval Morrisseau. This work is a dialogue, a response to his vision, struggles and brilliance as an artist. TransMigration celebrates Morrisseau’s visual language through sublime dance and music, vibrating with colour, energy, and sensuality. TransMigration is not a biography but pays homage to “The Artist” and is ultimately a reflection of humanity and the power of spirit to transform and transcend.  — Jessica Cudney, Marketing Assistant

Santee Smith, Artistic Director/Choreographer
Renowned actor Raoul Trujillo to play “The Artist”.
Photo: David Hou
Kaha:wi Dance Theatre »
Harbourfront Centre Box Office »
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Tuesday, March 27, 2012

30 Things We Love About Toronto: No. 22 Norval Morrisseau

Where magazine have included a reference to Kinsman Robinson Galleries and specifically to the artworks of Norval Morrisseau in their April issue as one of the "30 Things We Love About Toronto". No. 22: Learning more about Canada's First Nations heritage through the works of Anishinaabe artist Norval Morrisseau, including The Sacred Bear Giving Children and Animals a Ride (pictured), at Kinsman Robinson Galleries (See page 66 April edition of Toronto magazine). From where.ca: Where magazine provides timely, local information on the hottest and most essential shopping, dining, cultural attractions and entertainment. Download digital edition »
30 Things We Love About Toronto this April »
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Friday, March 23, 2012

Morrisseau's Painting Bear & Fish Harmony

Bear & Fish Harmony, 1978 [SOLD]
Acrylic on paper, 17.5x23.5 in, 44.45x59.69 cm
Marked by its deft fluidity of line, this painting is a masterful portrayal of its genre. Sacred fish is seated diagonally atop sacred bear. The two are connected by communication lines as power lines emanate from the fish. Norval Morrisseau executed one of his universal themes at the height of his Pollock period: the interconnection of all creatures, and their dependence on each other for survival. According to Ojibwe lore, sacred fish (pointing right towards the future) is the vessel for carrying the soul to the afterlife while the spirits of their ancestors are said to inhabit the bear (pointing left towards the past).
Provenance:
Private Collection, Toronto
The Pollock Gallery, Toronto (label verso)
Acquired directly from the artist
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Sunday, March 18, 2012

Morrisseau Signed COA 'For The Money'

Here's a telling comment that was originally posted to Mr. Matulic's blog by Norval Morrisseau's youngest son, Christian, on 28 November, 2007 (click on image to enlarge). The comment has since been removed by Mr. Matulic. Beginning at line 5, Christian states, "What is the point of having this blog if spirit walker only posts what he wants to share with the rest of us." He goes on to write, "In the spring of 2002 in thunder bay Ontario* A fellow by the name of mr Bill Wallace came to the house with A # of painting and asked my father [Norval Morrisseau] to authenticate some painting for him and his partner — And for a fee My father did.  he sign papers with the paintings picture on the paper stating the painting where his — Just after mr Bill Wallace left my father called me back into the room and said to me that he has never painted or even seen these paintings ever — So I asked him why did you sign then, he replied well for the money!"

To recap, while the Morrisseau signatures and thumbprints on these so-called Certificates of Authenticity** are real — no forensic examiner required — they're not worth the paper they're written on as a means of authentication. Besides, if a person is forced, tricked, or coerced into entering into an agreement, then typically it is not considered to be "legally binding".
Endnotes
*During this 2002 trip to Thunder Bay, Norval Morrisseau was not advised by either Don Robinson or KRG, nor was he in the care of Gabe Vadas. Rather, he acted of his own accord in the care of his relatives.
**KRG no longer issue COAs per ADAC directive 2007/03/13.
See our related post: Don't be misled by COAs »
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Thursday, March 15, 2012

Morrisseau's Painting Mikkinak, The Turtle

Mikkinak, The Turtle, 1989 [SOLD]
Acrylic on canvas, 48x30in, 121.92x76.2cm
Painted while the artist lived in the A-frame house at Aldergrove, BC on the Coghlan Art Studio property.
Provenance:
Private Collection, Maple Ridge, BC
Acquired from the artist

"Mikkinak, the ancient sacred turtle of the Ojibway shaking tent rites. The turtle was the interpreter of the demi-gods who came into the shaking tent ceremony performed by the shaman. The lines represent continuation, and the balls, the never ending circle of power." -from exhibition catalogue by Musée du Québec (now Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec), 1966
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Saturday, March 10, 2012

A History of 'Genuine Morrisseau'

On 7 March, 2008, Paul Robinson started a blog called Genuine Morrisseau From KRG in an effort to refute the misinformation that has been circulating on the Internet since 2007. Paul established KRG’s blog in order to inform the public, and in particular KRG’s clientele, of the continuing discussion concerning the authenticity of Norval Morrisseau art. On 18 June, 2009, Paul suspended the blog in order to concentrate his efforts on the emerging micro-blogging site, Twitter. By 18 September, 2010, Paul resumed the blog as he became increasingly aware that the concerted campaign of misinformation was not going away.

So, let's continue to separate fact from fiction: On one side, you have the artist, Norval Morrisseau, who said, "I, Norval Morrisseau, did not paint the picture shown in the photograph" after he was shown a reproduction of an alleged Morrisseau on 18 October, 2004 at his Toronto hotel. Then you have the artist's dealer, Don Robinson, having handled well over 1,000 authentic Norval Morrisseaus acquired directly from the artist over 18 years, who said that various alleged Morrisseaus were "not painted by Norval Morrisseau's hand" in 4 separate expert reports that were relied upon by the Courts.

On the other side, you have a document examiner, with impressive credentials yet no fine art experience, who said, "In my opinion there is strong support for the view that the author of the K1-K13 specimen material wrote the questioned signatures on Q1-Q3". However, he qualifies his statement by saying, "The absence of specimen signatures executed with a brush and paint has limited the scope of this examination".

Now, uh, who are you going to believe?
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Monday, February 27, 2012

Kinsman Robinson Galleries v. Ugo Matulic

On 23 December, 2010, Kinsman Robinson Galleries filed a lawsuit in The Ontario Superior Court of Justice against blogger Ugo Matulic for libel (i.e. the communication of false information about a person, a group, or an entity such as a corporation that injures a reputation or good name). Court File No. CV-10-417123.

KRG Notice of Action and Statement of Claim

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Monday, February 13, 2012

Norval, the Natural-born Artist

 "My name is Norval," he said, "I have brought you some art." We noticed that his face was lit up by a pair of deep penetrating dark eyes, which seemed to express a strange mixture of both mockery and shyness. [. . .] even though his impassive features retained a look of childlike innocence, we would have to be particularly careful when a coy smile appeared on his face, this being a sure sign that he intended to pry something out of us. [. . .] despite being sparing of words, he was basically a very cunning individual who was well able to look after his own interests.
Excerpt by Joseph Weinstein, MD, author of The White Ojibway Medicine Man and Other Stories.  KRG is honoured to have had access to select works by Norval Morrisseau from the esteemed collection of Esther and Joseph Weinstein, Israel.  The Weinsteins were among the earliest and most influential patrons of Norval Morrisseau while they lived in the remote Red Lake area from 1955 to 1963 having collected over fifty works by the yet-to-be-recognized artist.  "In those days Norval was an Indian living in the woods," said Dr. Weinstein, "He had never before seen any other art or art books."  Dr. Weinstein personally inscribed KRG's copy of his 2009 book.  He wrote, "To Don and Paul of the Kinsman Robinson Galleries in tribute to your promotion of the art of Norval Morriseau."
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Tuesday, February 7, 2012

50-year Morrisseau Retrospective

Norval Morrisseau's major dealer and principal gallery will showcase a 50-year retrospective of Morrisseau's artwork from Sep 15 until Oct 20, 2012. "Norval Morrisseau 2012 Retrospective" will feature photographs of the revered artist as well as 50 works of art in order to celebrate the fifty-year anniversary since Morrisseau burst onto the Canadian art scene.

Norval Morrisseau came to prominence following his first sold-out exhibition at Toronto's Pollock Gallery in 1962. Time Magazine (Sep 28, 1962) reported, “Few exhibits in Canadian history have touched off a greater immediate stir than Morrisseau's.” It's a statement that was true half a century ago and still holds true today. Time wrote, "The Toronto critics approved unanimously and speculated that self-taught Morrisseau may have launched a vogue as chic as that of the Cape Dorset Eskimo's prints."

Founded in 1980, Kinsman Robinson Galleries (KRG) specializes in Norval Morrisseau art of exceptional calibre and significance. The gallery co-authored two hardcover books along with Norval Morrisseau. KRG has held three catalogued exhibitions since Norval Morrisseau passed away. 2012 Retrospective is set to be one of the biggest Morrisseau exhibitions of recent years featuring both paintings and drawings by the iconic Canadian painter Norval Morrisseau.
Twitter | kinsmanrobinson.com

Friday, January 27, 2012

Morrisseau 'A Brilliant Painter'

Excerpt from Vancouver Sun article:
"He was a brilliant painter," Don Robinson, Morrisseau's principal art dealer in Toronto between 1989 and his death, said in an interview Thursday.

"This man is better recognized around the world than many Canadian artists," he added.

He recalled that Morrisseau instantly earned acclaim at his first art show in 1962 at the Jack Pollock gallery.

"He had almost overnight fame," he said, adding that Morrisseau's shows at Robinson's gallery repeatedly sold out.

Robinson's gallery, the Kinsman Robinson Galleries in Toronto, now run by his son Paul Robinson, has scheduled a 50-year retrospective of Morrisseau's work next September. 
-nhall@vancouversun.com  Read more »
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Monday, January 23, 2012

NMHS Public Statement

"The NMHS is aware that there are many works available for sale to the public that are falsely attributed to Norval Morrisseau. When buying a work of art, ask the art dealer or art gallery about the origin and source of the work."

Part of a public statement issued by The Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society (NMHS) in 2006. So let's debunk some of the myths: The NMHS have not disbanded. The official database recognizing Norval Morrisseau's life's work continues to expand. Sotheby's and Joyner Waddington's auction houses each withdrew alleged Morrisseaus prior to their respective 2011 fall sales. An authoritative text on Norval Morrisseau is underway.  Read more »

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Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Morrisseau Archive Footage, 1967

Here's some early CBC archive footage of Norval Morrisseau at age 37 filmed on location in Beardmore, Ontario during 1967.
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Sunday, January 1, 2012

Morrisseau's Studio, Nanaimo 2001

It's 2012 and you're in for a treat. For starters, here's a rare glimpse inside Norval Morrisseau's former Crace Street studio in the city of Nanaimo. It was a two-story building with stairs to a loft. Visible are Norval's big-screen TV (before they became so mainstream) which he enjoyed immensely as well as many of the collectables with which Morrisseau liked to surround himself. Note the varied and diverse artworks (from carvings to painted drums) and the abundance of green houseplants — a few of the things that stood out in my mind. It seemed to me like a bright and cheery place within which to live and to paint. Imagine traveling back in time and being in that studio while Norval worked. Though Gabe Vadas rented a nearby house, he spent many a night sleeping in the loft in order to properly care for Norval. I remember so distinctly, moments before leaving to catch our flight to the mainland, Norval asked if we could bring him some Gatorade. So, off we went in search of a case of Gatorade. 
— Happy 2012 from KRG — Thanks to everyone who follows us on Twitter. Here's to 50 years since Norval Morrisseau's surge in popularity and to celebrating all things Morrisseau!
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